How COVID-19 Sheltering in Place May Ultimately Affect our Children

What if … instead of our kids being “behind” after this pandemic, this group of kids are actually more advanced because of it!

What if they have more empathy, they enjoy family connection, they can be more creative and entertain themselves, they love to read, they love to express themselves in writing.

What if they enjoy the simple things, like their own backyard and sitting near a window in the quiet.

What if they notice the birds and the dates the different flowers emerge and calming renewal of a gentle rain shower?

What if this generation are the ones to learn to cook and organize their space and do their laundry and keep a well run home?

What if they learn to stretch a dollar and learn to live with less?

What if they learn to plan shopping trips and meals at home?

What if they learn the value of eating together as a family and finding the good to share in the small delights of the everyday?

What if they are the ones to place great value on our teachers and educational professional, librarians, public servants and the previously invisible essential support workers like truck drivers, groceries, cashiers, custodial workers, health care workers and their supporting staff, just to name a few of the millions taking care of us right now while we are sheltered in place?

What if among these children, a great leader emerges who had the benefit of a slower pace and a simpler life to truly learn what really matters in this life?

What if they are ahead?

The Musée du Louvre’s Collections

The Musée du Louvre’s Collections

The Musée du Louvre’s Press Room

Two new digital tools have just gone live to bring the richness of the Louvre collections to the world’s fingertips: collections.louvre.fr, a platform that for the first time ever brings together all of the museum’s artworks in one place; and a new and improved website, louvre.fr, that is more user-friendly, attractive and immersive.

The website has an interactive map that allows people to explore the museum and every one of its artworks room by room.

While the museum is still closed to visitors, the Louvre is now undergoing long-planned renovations.

10 Things Everyone Should Know About Ukraine

10 Things Everyone Should Know About Ukraine

Made in partnership with the Ukrainian Institute and H.S. Pshenychnyi Central State Film, Photo and Sound Archive of Ukraine

’10 Things Everyone Should Know About Ukraine’ brings to life familiar and yet unknown stories about Ukraine. Ten short films [just over an hour in total] tell about famous figures, historical and cultural events in Ukraine, and invite to see Ukraine of ХІХ-ХХI in the local and world contexts.

Intro: 10 Things Everyone Should Know About Ukraine

Taras Shevchenko: The Serf Who Founded a Nation

The Many Voices of Ukraine

Lesia Ukrainka: Fin-de-siècle Ukrainian Feminism

Why Do Ukrainians Take To The Streets?

Les Kurbas: Ukrainian Avant-Garde Theatre

Fighting for the Self: Poetry from the Gulag

Holodomor: The Ukrainian Famine of the 1930s

Ukrainian Cinema: Giving a Voice to the Silenced

The Bloodlands: Ukraine in World War II

Andrei Sheptytskyi: A Count Who Became a Priest

Andrei Sheptytskyi: A Count Who Became a Priest

Made in partnership with the Ukrainian Institute and H.S. Pshenychnyi Central State Film, Photo and Sound Archive of Ukraine

The extraordinary story of Andrei Sheptytskyi, a count who gave up a life of wealth to become a Ukrainian Catholic priest, who saved Jewish lives in WWII and eventually founded Ukraine’s most modern university.

With Bishop Borys Gudziak, Archeparch of Philadelphia for Ukrainians and Metropolitan for the Ukrainian Catholic Church in the USA, President of the Ukrainian Catholic University.

The Bloodlands: Ukraine in World War II

Made in partnership with the Ukrainian Institute and H.S. Pshenychnyi Central State Film, Photo and Sound Archive of Ukraine

How the multiple occupations of Ukraine during the Second World War had a devastating impact on the populations of Ukraine, including the Holocaust.

With Professor Timothy Snyder, the Richard C. Levin Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna.

Ukrainian Cinema: Giving a Voice to the Silenced

Made in partnership with the Ukrainian Institute and H.S. Pshenychnyi Central State Film, Photo and Sound Archive of Ukraine

Throughout its history, Ukrainian cinema has captured the plight of marginalised peoples and identities, allowing those forgotten or hidden from society to come to life on screen.

With Dr Olga Bryukhovetska, Associate Professor of Cultural Studies at the National University of Kyiv Mohyla Academy.

Lesia Ukrainka: Fin-de-siècle Ukrainian Feminism

Made in partnership with the Ukrainian Institute and H.S. Pshenychnyi Central State Film, Photo and Sound Archive of Ukraine

How Ukrainian modernist writer Lesia Ukrainka (1871-1913) pioneered a new feminist literature, at the forefront of European trends of the time.

With Dr Sasha Dovzhyk, Associate Research Fellow, Birkbeck, University of London.

Holodomor: The Ukrainian Famine of the 1930s

Made in partnership with the Ukrainian Institute and H.S. Pshenychnyi Central State Film, Photo and Sound Archive of Ukraine

Why Should the World Care?’ How the Holodomor fits into the wider understanding of Stalin’s USSR, and how the famine was covered in world media.

With Dr Daria Mattingly, Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellow and Affiliated Lecturer in Slavonic Studies, University of Cambridge.

Fighting for the Self: Poetry from the Gulag

Made in partnership with the Ukrainian Institute and H.S. Pshenychnyi Central State Film, Photo and Sound Archive of Ukraine

How the dissident poet Vasyl Stus fought for human and national rights and created unique poetry of the self, overcoming the extreme conditions of the Soviet Gulag.

With Dr Bohdan Tokarsky, URIS Fellow at the University of Basel and the 2020/21 Prisma Ukraїna Fellow at the Forum Transregionale Studien, Berlin.