The Culture Map: Breaking Through the Invisible Boundaries of Global Business

By Erin Meyer

Why does your Swedish colleague have so many problems leading his Chinese team? How do you foster a good relationship with your Brazilian suppliers while sitting at your desk in Europe? How do you navigate the tricky task of performance reviews when your American employees precede negative feedback with three nice comments, while the French, Dutch, Israelis, and Germans skip the positives and get straight to the point? What is the best method for getting your team based on four continents to work together effectively?

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We Are One

We Are One

“We are the World.” The World is One. We are One.
“… so let’s start giving.”

Wikipedia

A widespread famine affected Ethiopia from 1983 to 1985. The worst famine to hit the country in a century, it affected 7.75 million people (out of Ethiopia’s 38–40 million) and left approximately 300,000 to 1.2 million dead. 2.5 million people were internally displaced whereas 400,000 refugees left Ethiopia. Almost 200,000 children were orphaned.

The famine has been caused from drought, from the Ethiopian Civil War and from military policies taken by the Ethiopian government.

In December 1984, musician and activist Harry Belafonte began to think about an American benefit single for African famine relief. He enlisted fundraiser Ken Kragen to help bring the vision to reality. The duo contacted several musicians, and ultimately, Jackson and Richie were assigned to write the song.

We Are the World” is a charity single originally recorded by the supergroup USA for Africa in 1985. It was written by Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie and produced by Quincy Jones and Michael Jackson for the album We Are the World. With sales in excess of 20 million copies, it is the eighth best-selling physical single of all time.

USAforAfricaVEVO | YouTube

There comes a time
When we heed a certain call
When the world must come together as one
There are people dying
Oh, and it’s time to lend a hand to life
The greatest gift of all

We can’t go on
Pretending day-by-day
That someone, somewhere soon make a change
We’re all a part of God’s great big family
And the truth, you know, love is all we need

We are the world
We are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day, so let’s start giving
There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day, just you and me

Oh, send them your heart
So they know that someone cares
And their lives will be stronger and free
As God has shown us by turning stones to bread
And so we all must lend a helping hand

We are the world
We are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day, so let’s start giving
Oh, there’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day, just you and me

When you’re down and out, there seems no hope at all
But if you just believe there’s no way we can fall
Well, well, well, well let us realize
Oh, that a change can only come
When we stand together as one, yeah, yeah, yeah

We are the world
We are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day, so let’s start giving
There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day, just you and me

We are the world
We are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day, so let’s start giving
There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day, just you and me

We are the world (are the world)
We are the children (are the children)
We are the ones who’ll make a brighter day, so let’s start giving (so let’s start giving)
There is a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day, just you and me

Oh, let me hear you!

We are the world (we are the world)
We are the children (said we are the children)
We are the ones who’ll make a brighter day so let start giving (so let’s start giving)

There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day, just you and me, come on now, let me hear you

We are the world (we are the world)
We are the children (we are the children)
We are the ones who’ll make a brighter day so let’s start giving (so let’s start giving)
There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day, just you and me, yeah

We are the world (we are the world)
We are the children (we are the children)
We are the ones who’ll make a brighter day so let’s start giving (so let’s start giving)

There’s a choice we’re making
And we’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day, just you and me

We are the world (are the world)
We are the children (are the children)
We are the ones who’ll make a brighter day so let’s start giving (so let’s start giving)

There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day, just you and me

We are the world, we are the world (are the world)
We are the children, yes sir (are the children)
We are the ones that make a brighter day so let’s start giving (so let’s start giving)

There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day, just you and me, ooh-hoo!

We are the world (dear God) (are the world)
We are the children (are the children)
We are the ones that make a brighter day so let’s start giving (all right, can you hear what I’m saying?)
There’s a choice we’re making, we’re saving our own lives

We shall Remember: Bosnian War 1992–1995

We shall Remember: Bosnian War 1992–1995

Wikipedia

The Bosnian War (Serbo-Croatian: Rat u Bosni i Hercegovini / Рат у Босни и Херцеговини) was an international armed conflict that took place in Bosnia and Herzegovina between 1992 and 1995. Resulted in military stalemate, causing:

  • Internal partition of Bosnia and Herzegovina according to the Dayton Accords.
  • Over 101,000 dead, mainly Bosniaks.
  • First genocide in Europe since World War II.
  • Deployment of NATO-led forces to oversee the peace agreement.
  • Establishment of the Office of the High Representative to oversee the civilian implementation of the peace agreement.

U2 | YouTube

We must also understand what life is like at the time of war. This video for the 1995 Passengers single Miss Sarajevo from the album Original Soundtracks 1 is directed by Bill Carter. It features footage from his documentary of the same name, filmed in war-torn Bosnia in 1993, and includes the capital city’s beauty contest which was held in a basement at the time to avoid attack.

Is there a time for keeping your distance?
A time to turn your eyes away?
Is there a time for keeping your head down?
For getting on with your day?
Is there a time for kohl and lipstick?
A time for curling hair?
Is there a time for high street shopping?
To find the right dress to wear?

Here she comes, oh oh
Heads turn around
Here she comes
To take her crown

Is there a time to run for cover?
A time for kiss and tell?
Is there a time for different colors?
Different names you find it hard to spell
Is there a time for first communion?
A time for East Seventeen?
Is there a time to turn to Mecca?
Is there time to be a beauty queen?

Here she come, oh oh
Beauty plays the clown
Here she comes
Surreal in her crown

Dici che il fiume
Trova la via al mare
E come il fiume
Giungerai a me
Oltre i confini
E le terre assetate
Dici che come fiume
Come fiume
L’amore giungerà
L’amore
E non so più pregare
E nell’amore non so più sperare
E quell’amore non so più aspettare

for tying ribbons?
(A time) for Christmas trees?
(Is there a time) for laying tables?
And the night is set to freeze?


Martin Gallino | YouTube

Same single accompanied by David Turnley’s photographs.

This collection of photographs is a tribute to the people of Bosnia, to the nearly 100,000 people killed, and some 2.3 million refugees displaced by the war between 1992 and 1996, as well as the resilience of their human spirit. I photographed this prima ballerina of the Sarajevo Ballet, who danced in her studio, torn, by her own means to rehearse, every day, during the war, in the midst of full-scale bombing attacks, it was her way of defeating the war. This became a symbol of the resistance of many people who simply refused to be defeated by the cruelty of the most devastating war in Europe since World War II. This is also a tribute to all my fellow photographers who are risking their lives and using their photographs as well to defeat the war.

 

Being a Part… Standing Apart

Being a Part… Standing Apart

By Carly Fiorina | Leadership Matters | LinkedIn Newsletter | April 10, 2022

One of the great pleasures of working on a team is we form relationships. We get to know people as we work with them. We can form strong bonds when we have accomplished an important objective or overcome long odds. Real friendships form. We come to count on each other, trust one another and value each other.

For those of you who have followed this newsletter for a while, or participated in one of my workshops, you know I am fond of saying: “Balance is the art of leadership.” Leaders must learn to balance the short-term and the long-term. They must balance clear-eyed realism with aspiration and inspiration. They must balance goals that are challenging enough to result in truly improved performance with the need for success along the way.

Leaders need to be a part of the team: as committed as anyone else on the team, able to do what is necessary to help the team, and willing to “take one for the team” if necessary. And yet leaders must balance this being a part, with the need to stand apart in order to see clearly what is happening. A leader cannot miss the forest for the trees. A leader’s personal relationships cannot get in the way of accountability, truth-telling, team-building, or oversight. This happens too often: in the board room, in the C-Suite, and on every kind of team.

I am not talking here about romantic relationships, although obviously, these are always problematic when people are working together. While I am not minimizing the consequences, most of us understand how these kinds of relationships cloud people’s judgment and impair decision-making.

Instead, I’m talking about something more subtle. What happens when an executive describes a subordinate as “my best friend?” Or when a board member pushes back on fiduciary oversight because they “trust the CEO?” Or a team leader confides in a particularly close teammate on a regular basis but doesn’t share this same information with other team members?

In the first case, there is a real risk that the strength of a personal friendship outweighs objectivity about performance. In the second case, appropriate checks and balances, inspection, and oversight get waved aside because everyone assumes nothing bad will ever happen. In the third case, the team begins to break down as suspicion grows that not everyone is held to the same standards or given the same information. And in every case, the leader is less effective and so is the team’s performance.

So how can a leader balance being a part while standing apart?

  1. Be self-aware. Understand where your personal relationships lie. Who are you most comfortable with? Who do you spend most of your time with? Whom do you confide in?
  2. Broaden, beyond your comfort zone, the opinions you seek, the conversations you have, with whom you spend your time. You’ll learn something new every time.
  3. Build objective measures around performance for every member of the team or organization. No exceptions. This is hard work but absolutely critical to real accountability. Good performance management is always built on quantifiable metrics of success. Without objective performance criteria, favoritism always creeps into the equation.
  4. Don’t rely solely on your own judgment about someone else’s work or impact. Consider making 360 feedback a part of everyone’s evaluation. At the very least, always seek the input of others so you regularly test your own judgment.
  5. Design processes that are independent of personalities. What should fiduciary oversight look like no matter who is seated in which chair? What should quality control look like if you don’t know who is doing the job? If the work has real impact, put risk assessment processes in place. No matter who is doing important work, there needs to be regular inspection and an early warning system of potential trouble ahead.

Why does all this matter? Because to be effective, a leader must be seen as fair. To get the highest performance out of a team, every team member must know that performance counts. To build a culture that is diverse, equitable, and inclusive, people need to know that what you do matters more than who you know.


Originally published on LinkedIn by Carly Fiorina. #leadership #balanced

Forever Young

Forever Young

By Alphaville | Released 1984

Let’s dance in style, let’s dance for a while
Heaven can wait we’re only watching the skies
Hoping for the best, but expecting the worst
Are you gonna drop the bomb or not?

Let us die young or let us live forever
We don’t have the power, but we never say never
Sitting in a sandpit, life is a short trip
The music’s for the sad man

Can you imagine when this race is won?
Turn our golden the faces into the sun
Praising our leaders, we’re getting in tune
The music’s played by the, the madman

Forever young
I want to be forever young
Do you really want to live forever?
Forever, and ever

Forever young
I want to be forever young
Do you really want to live forever?
Forever young

Some are like water, some are like the heat
Some are a melody and some are the beat
Sooner or later they all will be gone
Why don’t they stay young?

It’s so hard to get old without a cause
I don’t want to perish like a fading horse
Youth’s like diamonds in the sun
And diamonds are forever

So many adventures given up today
So many songs we forgot to play
So many dreams swinging out of the blue
Oh let it come true

Forever young
I want to be forever young
Do you really want to live forever
Forever, and ever? [repeat one more time]

Forever young
I want to be forever young
Do you really want to live forever
Forever young

Ukrainian Studies at the Harriman Institute of Columbia University

In this video, Professor Alexander Motyl discusses the Ukrainian Studies Program at Harriman Institute, Columbia University and the late Peter Jacyk.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of Peter Jacyk’s birth and the completion of the monumental English translation project of Hrushevsky’s History of Ukraine-Rus’, produced by the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies (CIUS) at the University of Alberta.

To celebrate and commemorate these two extraordinary milestones and achievements, the Petro Jacyk Education Foundation is releasing a series of short videos about Peter Jacyk, his values and philanthropy, as well as the Hrushevsky Translation Project.

New enlightening videos will be uploaded every week to the PJEF YouTube Channel.
Stay tuned!

Website: jacykfoundation.com
Facebook: facebook.com/petrojacyked

Resources to Learn Ukrainian Language

Resources to Learn Ukrainian Language

Ukrainian Institute

The Ukrainian Institute is a public institution affiliated with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine. Our mission is to strengthen Ukraine’s international standing through the means of cultural diplomacy. We facilitate international connections between people and institutions and create opportunities for Ukraine to interact and cooperate with the world.

Promotion of the Ukrainian language in the world is one of the five strategic goals of the Institute.

A list of resources for learning Ukrainian is on the Ukrainian Institute’s website ⬇️

ui.org.ua/en/sector-en/learn-ukrainian-language/

💬 Podcasts, online platforms, audio guides, textbooks, and summer schools — explore educational opportunities and share them with your friends, who learn the Ukrainian language.

The Harvard Library of Ukrainian Literature

The Harvard Library of Ukrainian Literature

Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University (HURI)

HURI launched new publications series with the focus on modern Ukrainian literature in English translation. All titles will be distributed in a variety of print and digital formats by Harvard University Press, and they will be available for access on the newly developed website. Learn more and explore four inaugural titles here.

Founded in June 1973, the Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University (commonly known as HURI) serves as a focal point for graduate and undergraduate students, fellows, and associates pursuing research in Ukrainian language, literature, and history as well as in anthropology, archaeology, art history, economics, political science, sociology, theology, and other disciplines.

GoCamp’s Open Call for Volunteers

GoCamp’s Open Call for Volunteers

GoCamp | GoGlobal | NGO Global Office

This summer Ukraine invites volunteers for the largest educational programme in Eastern Europe. Join it and teach Ukrainian kids English and French at school camps all over the country! Options available for volunteers:

  • French program, where students will be encouraged to learn more about French culture and conduct changes in their communities.
  • Arts & Creativity program, where students will be encouraged to express themselves and the places they live in different art forms.

Both programs will take place online, from June 28 – July 9, 2021. Don’t miss the chance to help Ukrainian children, who might have never been to other countries or have never interacted with foreigners, get an amazing possibility to become real team players, critical thinkers and tolerant people who are ready to work in a multicultural environment.

Apply now at gocamps.com.ua/apply-as-a-volunteer/

We are grateful for your consideration of joining the GoCamp project and your help spreading the information about this initiative for more people to see our open call and join us to educate a new young generation of active and conscious citizens of Ukraine!


Thank you for being part of the GoGlobal story!


The GoCamp project is organized within the GoGlobal initiative aimed at promoting language learning and volunteer movement in Ukraine, fostering intercultural dialogue and public diplomacy. GoGlobal is working on ensuring that Ukrainians speak foreign languages, and thus have a chance to be heard all around the world. The GoGlobal initiative is powered by Global Office NGO from Ukraine.

Монографія Адама Бобровича: Гораєць

Автор книги Адам Бобрович | bobrowicz.ad@gmail.com | +48 601 729 953
Інформацію подав Стефан Лашин | slaszyn@aol.com | (516) 582-0258, член 42-ГО ВІДДІЛУ ООЧСУ на Лонг Айленд

Наприкінці червня 2021 року піде у світ обширна монографія Адама Бобровича “Gorajec” (“Гораєць”). Публікація є кульмінацією кропіткої та напруженої роботи автора. Це чудовий подарунок для жителів Горайця та їх нащадків — чарівного села розташованого в Любачівському повіті, Польща. Continue reading “Монографія Адама Бобровича: Гораєць”

10 Things Everyone Should Know About Ukraine

10 Things Everyone Should Know About Ukraine

Made in partnership with the Ukrainian Institute and H.S. Pshenychnyi Central State Film, Photo and Sound Archive of Ukraine

’10 Things Everyone Should Know About Ukraine’ brings to life familiar and yet unknown stories about Ukraine. Ten short films [just over an hour in total] tell about famous figures, historical and cultural events in Ukraine, and invite to see Ukraine of ХІХ-ХХI in the local and world contexts.

Intro: 10 Things Everyone Should Know About Ukraine

Taras Shevchenko: The Serf Who Founded a Nation

The Many Voices of Ukraine

Lesia Ukrainka: Fin-de-siècle Ukrainian Feminism

Why Do Ukrainians Take To The Streets?

Les Kurbas: Ukrainian Avant-Garde Theatre

Fighting for the Self: Poetry from the Gulag

Holodomor: The Ukrainian Famine of the 1930s

Ukrainian Cinema: Giving a Voice to the Silenced

The Bloodlands: Ukraine in World War II

Andrei Sheptytskyi: A Count Who Became a Priest

Клептократія: Влада Крадіїв

Фільм Дениса Казанського та Дениса Каплунова

Kleptocracy (from Greek κλέπτης kléptēs, “thief”, κλέπτω kléptō, “I steal”, and -κρατία -kratía from κράτος krátos, “power, rule”) is a government whose corrupt leaders (kleptocrats) use political power to appropriate the wealth of their nation, typically by embezzling or misappropriating government funds at the expense of the wider population.

35th Anniversary of the Chornobyl Disaster

35th Anniversary of the Chornobyl Disaster

The Ukrainian Weekly | Sunday, May 4, 1986, No. 18, Vol. LIV

The_Ukrainian_Weekly_1986-18

On April 26, 1986, a tragedy of unspeakable magnitude occurred at the Chornobyl nuclear power plant in Northern Ukraine. At 1:23 AM, an explosion at the plant blew the concrete roof off Reactor #4 spewing huge amounts of toxic radioactive particles into the atmosphere. Other than immediate attempts by Chornobyl workers to put out the fire caused by the explosion, there was no official government reaction to this catastrophe – no announcements were made, no warnings given – nothing that showed the slightest concern for the population of Ukraine, or for the global community in general. In a deliberate act of what can only be seen as negligence and disregard for the safety of millions, Soviet authorities remained silent. Continue reading “35th Anniversary of the Chornobyl Disaster”

35 Years Later: Remembering the 1986 Chornobyl (Chernobyl) Nuclear Disaster

The Ukrainian Museum in New York City

35 years ago today, on April 26, 1986, the worst nuclear accident in history occurred in Chornobyl (Chernobyl), Ukraine.

Chronicle of Severe Days (1986) | 6.5 min
Film by Volodymyr (Vladimir) Shevchenko | Narrated by Elena Filatova

What you will see:

  • Pictures of workers digging under the reactor wearing no protective equipment. They attempted to stabilize the melting base of the destroyed reactor.
  • Pictures of the workers on the roof of the reactor putting radioactive debris back into the radioactive container. Shevchenko made these pictures on the roof himself, and it is likely that he was exposed to excessive radiation at this point.
  • Shevchenko filmed a falling MI-24 helicopter. The helicopter flew directly over the destroyed reactor container, and the pilot likely suffered excessive radiation that debilitated him in the air.

Continue reading “35 Years Later: Remembering the 1986 Chornobyl (Chernobyl) Nuclear Disaster”

How COVID-19 Sheltering in Place May Ultimately Affect our Children

What if … instead of our kids being “behind” after this pandemic, this group of kids are actually more advanced because of it!

What if they have more empathy, they enjoy family connection, they can be more creative and entertain themselves, they love to read, they love to express themselves in writing.

What if they enjoy the simple things, like their own backyard and sitting near a window in the quiet.

What if they notice the birds and the dates the different flowers emerge and calming renewal of a gentle rain shower?

What if this generation are the ones to learn to cook and organize their space and do their laundry and keep a well run home?

What if they learn to stretch a dollar and learn to live with less?

What if they learn to plan shopping trips and meals at home?

What if they learn the value of eating together as a family and finding the good to share in the small delights of the everyday?

What if they are the ones to place great value on our teachers and educational professional, librarians, public servants and the previously invisible essential support workers like truck drivers, groceries, cashiers, custodial workers, health care workers and their supporting staff, just to name a few of the millions taking care of us right now while we are sheltered in place?

What if among these children, a great leader emerges who had the benefit of a slower pace and a simpler life to truly learn what really matters in this life?

What if they are ahead?

The Musée du Louvre’s Collections

The Musée du Louvre’s Collections

The Musée du Louvre’s Press Room

Two new digital tools have just gone live to bring the richness of the Louvre collections to the world’s fingertips: collections.louvre.fr, a platform that for the first time ever brings together all of the museum’s artworks in one place; and a new and improved website, louvre.fr, that is more user-friendly, attractive and immersive.

The website has an interactive map that allows people to explore the museum and every one of its artworks room by room.

While the museum is still closed to visitors, the Louvre is now undergoing long-planned renovations.

Andrei Sheptytskyi: A Count Who Became a Priest

Made in partnership with the Ukrainian Institute and H.S. Pshenychnyi Central State Film, Photo and Sound Archive of Ukraine

The extraordinary story of Andrei Sheptytskyi, a count who gave up a life of wealth to become a Ukrainian Catholic priest, who saved Jewish lives in WWII and eventually founded Ukraine’s most modern university.

With Bishop Borys Gudziak, Archeparch of Philadelphia for Ukrainians and Metropolitan for the Ukrainian Catholic Church in the USA, President of the Ukrainian Catholic University.

The Bloodlands: Ukraine in World War II

Made in partnership with the Ukrainian Institute and H.S. Pshenychnyi Central State Film, Photo and Sound Archive of Ukraine

How the multiple occupations of Ukraine during the Second World War had a devastating impact on the populations of Ukraine, including the Holocaust.

With Professor Timothy Snyder, the Richard C. Levin Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna.

Ukrainian Cinema: Giving a Voice to the Silenced

Made in partnership with the Ukrainian Institute and H.S. Pshenychnyi Central State Film, Photo and Sound Archive of Ukraine

Throughout its history, Ukrainian cinema has captured the plight of marginalised peoples and identities, allowing those forgotten or hidden from society to come to life on screen.

With Dr Olga Bryukhovetska, Associate Professor of Cultural Studies at the National University of Kyiv Mohyla Academy.

Lesia Ukrainka: Fin-de-siècle Ukrainian Feminism

Made in partnership with the Ukrainian Institute and H.S. Pshenychnyi Central State Film, Photo and Sound Archive of Ukraine

How Ukrainian modernist writer Lesia Ukrainka (1871-1913) pioneered a new feminist literature, at the forefront of European trends of the time.

With Dr Sasha Dovzhyk, Associate Research Fellow, Birkbeck, University of London.